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Don’t Miss Your Chance: Understanding New Hampshire’s Statute of Limitations

New Hampshire Civil Statute of Limitations: Types of Cases and Time Limits

When it comes to civil lawsuits, deadlines are crucial. The New Hampshire civil statute of limitations sets deadlines for when a legal action can be brought against another party.

The timing varies depending on the type of case and procedure being pursued. Time is counted down from the date of the incident in question, which means that if the deadline passes, the opposing party can file a motion to dismiss, and the claim is lost forever.

This is why it is important to understand the different time limits for each type of case. Injury to Person: Two Years

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury to your person, such as physical harm, the statute of limitations in New Hampshire is two years.

This means that if you don’t take legal action within two years from the incident occurring, you will lose the right to file a claim. Libel/Slander: Two Years

If someone has defamed your reputation through libel or slander, you have two years to file a civil lawsuit in New Hampshire.

Defamation can refer to anything from false accusations to negative statements made to a third party that harm your reputation. Fraud: Three Years

If someone has acted fraudulently towards you, then you have up to three years to file a legal action.

Fraud can be intentional and deceptive conduct, which harms another person or company. Injury to Personal Property: Three Years

If your personal property has been damaged, such as a vehicle, you have three years to file a lawsuit in New Hampshire.

Damaged property can result from property damage caused by a car accident, negligent property care, natural disasters, and many other scenarios. Professional Malpractice: Three Years

If you have suffered harm or damages due to a professional’s negligence or misconduct, you have up to three years to sue them.

This includes actions of a lawyer, accountant, or any professional that violates their duty of care and causes harm to a client. Trespass: Three Years

If someone has unlawfully entered or intruded upon your property, you have three years to file a lawsuit in New Hampshire.

This can include a situation in which someone exceeds or violates the limits of your property. Collection of Rents: Three Years

If someone owes you back rent, you have three years from the date the rent became due to file a lawsuit.

There are limitations on collection actions that are not written to protect tenants from being continuously harassed by landlords. Contracts Written: Three Years

If you have entered into a written contract, such as a rental or employment agreement, and there is a breach of contract, you have three years to file a lawsuit in New Hampshire.

Collection of Debt on Account: Three Years

If someone owes you money on an account, like a credit card or loan, you have three years from the date the debt became due to file a lawsuit. This also applies to any other type of unpaid debt.

Judgments: Twenty Years

When one wins a judgment and court orders the opposing party to pay back the debt, the time limit for collecting the debt is twenty years in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Criminal Statute of Limitations: Murder and Felonies, Misdemeanors, and Violations Time Limits

The statute of limitations also plays a crucial role in criminal cases in New Hampshire.

The time limit varies depending on the severity of the crime. Murder and Felonies: Six Years

Murder and felonies in New Hampshire have a six-year statute of limitations.

If law enforcement cannot file criminal charges within six years from the date the incident occurred, the accused person cannot be prosecuted. Misdemeanors: One Year Deadline

Misdemeanors, such as minor drug offenses, have a one-year deadline in New Hampshire.

The statute of limitations begins at the time of the arrest. Violations: Prosecuted within Three Months

Violations, such as traffic tickets, are prosecuted within three months of when the officer issues the ticket.

Final Words

Understanding the New Hampshire civil statute of limitations is crucial. It sets deadlines for taking legal action, and if the deadline passes, the opposing party can file a motion to dismiss, and the claim is lost.

Make sure you know the statute of limitations for the type of case that you have before pursuing legal action. The New Hampshire civil statute of limitations is crucial to understanding legal actions’ deadlines.

With the timing varying on the type of case and procedure, it is essential to take legal action before the deadline passes. For example, injuries to a person have a two-year statute of limitations, while judgments have a 20-year deadline.

The same goes for criminal charges like how misdemeanors have a one-year deadline, while violations are prosecuted within three months. Being aware of the statute of limitations is essential to achieve a successful outcome in a legal action.

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