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Hit and Run Accidents in Arizona: Laws Penalties and Defenses

Arizona Hit and Run Laws

Have you ever been involved in an accident where the other driver fled the scene without stopping to exchange information or to assist you? Hit and run accidents are all too common on Arizona roads.

In this article, we will discuss Arizona hit and run laws, including the penalties for leaving the scene of an accident and the requirements under ARS 28-662.

Penalties for Leaving the Scene of an Accident

If you leave the scene of an accident in Arizona, you can face serious penalties. Depending on the severity of the accident, leaving the scene can result in a misdemeanor or a felony charge.

A Class 3 misdemeanor applies to accidents where only property damage has occurred. If the accident resulted in injury or death, leaving the scene is a felony offense.

The penalty for this type of hit and run can include a fine of up to $150,000 and up to 15 years in prison. Even if you were not at fault for the accident, leaving the scene is a criminal offense.

Requirements under ARS 28-662

Arizona law requires drivers to stop and assist injured parties in the event of an accident. ARS 28-662 states that any driver involved in an accident resulting in injury or death must provide reasonable assistance to any injured person, including transportation to a medical facility if necessary.

This law also requires drivers to provide their name, address, and vehicle registration information to anyone involved in the accident or to the injured party if they are unable to exchange information. Failure to comply with these requirements can result in a Class 1 misdemeanor charge.

In Case of Accidents that Result in Injury or Death

If you are involved in an accident that results in injury or death, it is important to remain at the scene and provide assistance. Leaving the scene of an accident can result in felony charges and serious penalties.

If you are facing criminal charges for a hit and run accident, you need to consult a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

Hitting a Parked Vehicle

Even if you hit a parked vehicle, you are still required to stop and provide your information to the owner of the parked car or to any witnesses. Failure to stop and comply with Arizona hit and run laws can result in a Class 3 misdemeanor charge, which can carry a fine of up to $500 and up to 30 days in jail.

Fault and

Comparative Negligence in Arizona

In Arizona, the law follows the pure comparative fault rule when determining fault in personal injury cases. If you are injured in an accident and file a claim, the court will determine the percentage of fault for all parties involved, including the victim.

If you are found to be at fault for the accident, the court will reduce the amount of damages you can claim by your percentage of fault. For example, if you were in a car accident and the settlement was $100,000, but you were found 50% at fault, you would only be able to claim $50,000 in damages.

Comparative Negligence in Arizona

The comparative negligence rule allows for a fair evaluation of fault in personal injury cases in Arizona. If you have been injured in an accident, it is important to hire an experienced personal injury attorney to represent you.

Your attorney can help you gather evidence, negotiate with insurance companies, and navigate the legal system to ensure that you receive fair compensation for your injuries.

What to Do After a Hit and Run in Arizona

If you are the victim of a hit and run accident, it is important to stay at the scene and gather as much information as possible. Get the license plate number of the other vehicle, if possible.

Note the make and model of the car and any identifying features, such as bumper stickers or custom rims. Call the police and report the accident to your insurance company as soon as possible.

It is also important to seek medical attention, even if you do not feel any immediate symptoms. Some injuries, such as whiplash, may not appear until several days after the accident.

Conclusion

Arizona hit and run laws are in place to protect drivers and passengers on the roads. If you are involved in an accident in Arizona, it is important to remain at the scene, provide assistance, and comply with the law.

If you are facing criminal charges for a hit and run accident, contact a criminal defense attorney right away. If you have been injured in an accident, consult an experienced personal injury attorney to ensure that you receive fair compensation for your injuries.

Hit and Run Accidents: Victims

Being the victim of a hit and run accident can be a traumatic experience. It can leave you feeling violated, angry, and helpless.

However, there are steps you can take to increase the chances of the driver being caught and to receive fair compensation for your injuries. In this article, we will discuss the steps to take after a hit and run, how to increase the chances of the driver being caught, and how to solve a hit and run out of court.

We will also explore the defenses available to drivers in hit and run cases.

Steps to Take After a Hit and Run

The most important thing to do after a hit and run accident is to stay calm and take note of any details you can remember. Write down the make and model of the other vehicle, the license plate number, and any other identifying features, such as bumper stickers or dents.

Try to remember the direction in which the other vehicle was headed. Call the police and report the accident as soon as possible.

If there were any witnesses to the accident, ask for their contact information. They may be able to provide valuable information to the police or to your insurance company.

If possible, take photographs of the scene and any damage to your vehicle. This can help with the investigation and can also help with your insurance claim.

Increasing the Chances of the Driver Being Caught

If you are the victim of a hit and run, there are steps you can take to increase the chances of the driver being caught. First, describe the incident in as much detail as possible to the police.

Even small details can sometimes help identify the driver. Second, try to find witnesses who saw the accident or who may have seen the other vehicle leaving the scene.

Witnesses can provide valuable information to the police and can also testify in court if necessary. Third, if you were able to get a look at the other vehicle, take photographs of it.

This can help the police identify the vehicle and can also be used as evidence if the case goes to trial. Finally, contact a personal injury attorney.

An experienced attorney can help you navigate the legal system, negotiate with insurance companies, and can also conduct an investigation to identify the driver.

Solving a Hit and Run Out of Court

In some cases, hit and run cases can be resolved out of court. This usually involves a settlement agreement between the victim and the driver.

This type of settlement is common in hit and run cases where no one was seriously injured. In order to reach an out of court settlement, both parties must agree to the terms of the settlement.

This usually involves a monetary compensation to the victim and a promise by the driver to take responsibility for their actions and not to engage in hit and run accidents in the future.

Defenses for Hit and Run in Arizona

Arizona law recognizes several defenses for drivers charged with hit and run accidents. These defenses include reasonable fear of assault, not realizing you hit someone, and no intent to injure.

Reasonable Fear of Assault as a Defense

If a driver hit someone and fled the scene because they feared for their safety, they may be able to use reasonable fear of assault as a defense. However, the driver must be able to provide evidence that they had a reasonable fear for their safety, such as a history of being assaulted.

Not Realizing You Hit Someone as a Defense

If a driver can demonstrate that they did not realize they hit someone, they may be able to use lack of awareness as a defense. This defense is most commonly used in cases where the driver hit an object, such as a trash can or a tree.

No Intent to Injure as a Defense

If a driver hit someone by accident and had no intent to injure, they may be able to use this as a defense. In order for this defense to be successful, the driver must demonstrate that they did everything in their power to assist the victim after the accident.

Conclusion

Hit and run accidents can be devastating for victims. However, there are steps you can take to increase the chances of the driver being caught and to receive fair compensation for your injuries.

It is important to stay calm, take notes of any details, contact the police and a personal injury attorney, and try to find witnesses or any other evidence that may help identify the driver. If the case cannot be resolved out of court, there are several defenses available to drivers in hit and run cases.

In conclusion, being involved in a hit and run accident can be traumatizing, but there are steps for victims to take to increase the chances of the driver being caught and receiving fair compensation. It’s important to remain calm, take note of any details, contact the police and a personal injury attorney, and find witnesses or any evidence that may help identify the driver.

Understanding the defenses available to drivers in hit and run cases is also crucial. Overall, being informed and prepared can help victims navigate the complexities of these cases with greater ease, and it’s important to seek legal help if necessary.

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