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Indiana Legal Deadlines: What You Need to Know

Indiana Civil Statute of Limitations and Types of Cases with Set Deadlines

Whenever a person is considering bringing a lawsuit for a civil case, they should be aware of the Indiana civil statute of limitations. This statute sets forth the deadlines for bringing a particular kind of legal action.

Once the deadline has passed, a person can no longer sue for a specific type of claim. In Indiana, there are specific time limits set for different types of civil cases, which we will discuss here.

Injury Cases

Injury cases, including those related to medical malpractice, have a two-year statute of limitations in Indiana. This means that a person has two years from the date of the injury to file a lawsuit.

If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, the case may not be heard, and the injured person may not be able to recover damages. Libel/Slander Cases

In Indiana, libel and slander claims have a one-year statute of limitations.

This means that a person has one year from the time that they believe they were defamed to bring a lawsuit. If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, then the claim will be barred, and the plaintiff will be unable to recover damages.

Fraud Cases

In fraud cases, Indiana has a two-year statute of limitations. This means that a person has two years from the time that they discover or should have discovered the fraud to file a lawsuit.

If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, the plaintiff may be barred from recovering damages.

Personal Property Cases

For claims related to personal property damage or loss, Indiana has a two-year statute of limitations. This means that a person has two years from the time of the loss or damage to file a lawsuit.

If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, then the plaintiff will be unable to claim any damages.

Trespass Cases

For trespass cases, Indiana has a statute of limitations of two years. This means that a person has two years from the time that the trespass occurred to file a lawsuit.

If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, the injured party may lose the opportunity to claim damages.

Collection of Rents Cases

Indiana has a 10-year statute of limitations for collection of rent incidents. This means that a landlord has ten years from the date of the lease agreement or last default payment to collect rent.

If the landlord doesn’t institute legal proceedings within that time, then their claim may be barred.

Contracts Cases

Indiana has a six-year statute of limitations for contract disputes, including breach of contract cases. This means that a person has six years from the time that the breach occurred to file a lawsuit.

If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, then the plaintiff may be unable to claim damages.

Debt on Account Cases

For debt on account cases, Indiana has a six-year statute of limitations. This means that a person has six years from the date of the last payment to file a lawsuit.

If the lawsuit is not filed within that time, then the plaintiff may be unable to recover the debt.

Judgments Cases

In Indiana, a judgment creditor has 10 years to collect the judgment. This means that if a creditor is awarded a judgment in court, they have ten years to take action to collect the debt.

If they do not take any legal action within that time, then the judgment may expire.

Indiana Criminal Statute of Limitations and Crimes Exempt from Statute of Limitations

Indiana criminal statute of limitations sets forth the time frame for bringing criminal charges in the state of Indiana. There are some crimes that are exempt from the statute of limitations, including heinous crimes such as murder and Class A felonies.

Felonies Cases

For felonies in Indiana, there is a five-year statute of limitations. This means that the state has five years from the time that the crime was committed to bring charges against the accused.

If the state does not bring charges within that time, then the accused may not be prosecuted.

Misdemeanor Cases

For misdemeanor cases, Indiana has a two-year statute of limitations. This means that the state has two years from the time that the crime was committed to bring charges.

If the state does not bring charges within that time, then the accused may not be prosecuted.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Indiana civil statute of limitations sets forth the time frame for bringing legal action for civil cases, including injury, libel and slander, fraud, personal property, trespass, collection of rents, contracts, debt on account, and judgments. In criminal cases, Indiana has different time limits for both felony and misdemeanor crimes.

Understanding the statute of limitations is crucial to ensure that a case is heard and a person’s rights are protected. In summary, the Indiana civil statute of limitations and criminal statute of limitations set deadlines for bringing legal action for various types of civil and criminal cases.

It is important to understand the specific time limits for each case to ensure that a case is heard and a person’s rights are protected. The takeaways from this article are that injury, libel and slander, fraud, personal property, trespass, collection of rents, contracts, debt on account, and judgments cases have different time frames for filing lawsuits or claims.

Additionally, felonies and misdemeanors have separate statutes of limitations as well. Understanding these deadlines is essential for anyone looking to pursue justice and protect their legal rights.

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